A NEW APPROACH TO IMPROVE THE HEALTH OUTCOMES OF WOMEN WITH GESTATIONAL DIABETES AND THEIR NEWBORNS

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) launched the global gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) model approach to care during a Satellite Symposium held at the IDF World Diabetes Congress in Vancouver. The new guidelines for healthcare professionals on GDM screening and management have been developed as part of the WINGS project (Women in India with GDM Strategy), a partnership between IDF, the Madras Diabetes Research Foundation (MDRF) in Chennai, India, and the Abbott Fund, the philanthropic foundation of the global health company Abbott, to tackle the rising prevalence of GDM in India and other low-resource settings.

FACTS AND FIGURES

  • In 2013, there were an estimated 184 million women with diabetes. By 2030, this number is expected to rise to 288 million.
  • Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women globally, causing 2.1 million deaths per year.
  • Sixty percent of the world’s poor are women, twice as many women as men suffer from malnutrition, and two thirds of illiterate adults are women.
  • The greatest increase in the female diabetes population over the next 20 years will be in the Middle East and North Africa Region (96%), followed by the Africa Region (90.4%) and South East Asia (74.4%).
  • Two out of every five women with diabetes are of reproductive age, accounting for over 60 million women worldwide.
  • High blood glucose, or hyperglycaemia, is one ofthe most common health problems of pregnancy.
  • Hyperglycaemia in pregnancy can be a result of either previously existing diabetes in a pregnant woman, or the development of insulin resistance later in the pregnancy in a condition known as gestational diabetes (GDM).
  • Any unmanaged hyperglycaemia in pregnancy can result in birth complications that can affect both mother and child including: increased risk of preeclampsia, obstructed labour due to fetal macrosomia and hypoglycaemia at birth for the infant.
  • The prevalence of hyperglycaemia in pregnancy increases rapidly with age and is highest in women over the age of 45.
  • As the prevalence of both obesity and diabetes in women of childbearing age continue to rise in all regions, so will the prevalence of hyperglycaemia in pregnancy.
  • Gestational diabetes (GDM) is any glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy, and develops in one in 25 pregnancies worldwide.
  • In India alone, an estimated 4 million women have GDM.
  • Approximately half of women with a history of GDM go on to develop type 2 diabetes within five to ten years after delivery.

 

Ref:

Click here to download IDF GDM MODEL OF CARE

http://www.idf.org/women-and-diabetes/resource-centre